International Congress of Arts and Science, Vol. 4: Law and Religion Comprising Lectures on Comparative Law, Brahmanism, Buddhism, Mohammedism, Old Testament, New Testament, History of the Christian Church, and History of Religions in the Nineteenth Centu

International Congress of Arts and Science, Vol. 4: Law and Religion Comprising Lectures on Comparative Law, Brahmanism, Buddhism, Mohammedism, Old Testament, New Testament, History of the Christian Church, and History of Religions in the Nineteenth Centu


International Congress of Arts and Science, Vol. 4: Law and Religion Comprising Lectures on Comparative Law, Brahmanism, Buddhism, Mohammedism, Old Testament, New Testament, History of the Christian Church, and History of Religions in the Nineteenth Centu

 


by
Howard Jason Rogers

  • Author: Howard Jason Rogers
  • Type: Mobi type
  • Pages: 408 pages
  • ISBN: none
  • ASIN: 9781333514136
  • Edition Language: English


  • Excerpt from International Congress of Arts and Science, Vol. 4: Law and Religion Comprising Lectures on Comparative Law, Brahmanism, Buddhism, Mohammedism, Old Testament, New Testament, History of the Christian Church, and History of Religions in the Nineteenth Century In order to set forth the characteristics of the Japanese Civil Code, it will be useful, first of all, briefly to explain the causes which led to the codification and give a short sketch of the history of its compilation.

    The causes which led to the reform and codification of the civil law are principally two. Download International Congress of Arts and Science, Vol. 4: Law and Religion Comprising Lectures on Comparative Law, Brahmanism, Buddhism, Mohammedism, Old Testament, New Testament, History of the Christian Church, and History of Religions in the Nineteenth Centu The first is to be found in the great social and political changes which have taken place since the opening of the country to foreign intercourse, especially since the restoration of the Emperor to actual power in 1868.

    It was just half a century ago that Commo dore Perry knocked at our doors to open the country to foreign trade. Aroused from the deep slumber of centuries, we rubbed our eyes, and saw Western civilization confronting us, but it was some time before we were wide awake, and realized the advantage of introducing it into our country.

    In a country which had remained entirely secluded for centuries from the rest of the world, it was quite natural that distrust, which in many cases grew to be hatred, of foreigners should at first have existed among the mass of the people; and that the cry of jo-i, or the expulsion of foreigners, should have been raised among them.

    Many far-sighted statesmen and scholars, however, clearly saw the necessity of introducing Western civilization and of adopting what ever seemed conducive to the intellectual or material progress of the country, in order that Japan might become a member of the family of nations.

    There were others, who, while understanding very well the necessity of introducing Western civilization, joined the anti-foreign party, in order to hasten the overthrow of the Sho gunate Government, for the expressions Sonno-joi, or Loyalty to the Emperor, and the expulsion of foreigners, although they had no necessary connection with one another, were at that time adopted as watchwords by the party of political reform, in order to set the mass of the people against the Shoguns Government.

    But as soon as their object was attained, and the present Emperor was restored to real power, they threw off the mask and kept only the former half of their watchword, Sonno, or Loyalty to the Emperor.

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